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Creativity and the chutzpah of the golden retriever

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Golden RetrieverI had heard the year’s CLIOs had been announced, and I couldn’t help myself. I pushed my copywriting project aside and Googled the recipients. As I scrolled through the ads with their beautiful/provocative imagery and witty/poetic copy, I yearned for a chance to stretch my own creative abilities. What could I accomplish given the right project, enough latitude? I scowled at the half-written FAQ about health deductibles on my desk, and I felt like a golden retriever whining at the screen door, tortured by the sound of migrating geese.

I sighed and turned back to my FAQs, all too aware of my adult responsibilities, and repressed my creative urges as I did so often, on a daily basis in fact. Trapped, like a dog, behind a flimsy screen that kept me from fulfilling my most cherished instincts.

But, you know what, it’s OK – I’ve learned that over the years. Because every once in a while, the sun will glint off the water in such a way it seems kissed by the gods, and the sight of waterfowl awakens those instincts so acutely they can’t be ignored. And at those times, we have the right—no, the obligation—to run without warning, to rip the leash out of the holder’s hand and leap into that murky water, to hell with being recently groomed, and swim like God intended to grab one of those birds, or at the very least send them into an agitated flurry of wings and squawks. Consequences be damned.

Leashing those God-given instincts

When I was at Aetna, I worked on a team that consisted of a musician, a screenplay writer, a painter, and me, a short fiction writer. We worked hard under tight deadlines and often delivered the impossible. But we were usually mired in projects that didn’t exactly stretch our abilities or our imagination. Often we were frustrated and daydreamed of more interesting ways to make a living, at least at some place free of cubicles. But we were prodded by bills and the promise of good health insurance benefits to come in every morning and slog our way through our tasks. Then we’d return home and carve out time whenever we could to do that which we truly loved.

Also while I was at Aetna, my family had a golden retriever, named Max. He wasn’t just any old golden retriever – Max was a field golden retriever. This meant he was more hyper and assertive than most goldens you might see, which tend to be the show variety. And unlike some dogs, who seem so domesticated they’re more like children in dog costumes than the descendants of wolves, Max still had a lot of his canine instincts. For instance, we would find a daily pile of stuffed animals and stray socks in the family room due to his retrieving instinct. And despite our efforts to make soft beds for him in our bedrooms, he insisted on sleeping on the hard floor next to the back door, as dictated by his watchdog instincts.

But like most goldens, Max was playful, gentle and adored kids. He put up a good front with his deep, impassioned barking whenever strangers passed our yard, but he was much more likely to nervously piddle on the floor than ever attack even an intruder.

Being a suburban golden retriever meant Max could never exercise to their fullest extent the instincts for which his forebears were bred. It was a little heartbreaking to hold Max back as he strained against his leash, wanting more than anything to swim after ducks in the neighborhood pond. The mournful look in his brown eyes was downright tragic. I always felt guilty that we didn’t live on five acres in the country and go duck hunting. That was the lifestyle a dog like Max deserved. He had to settle for a suburban backyard and daily walks on a leash.

The short, happy life of Flat Bertolini

Copywriting is a lonely business, which is why I always appreciated brainstorming sessions with my team at Aetna. Our director would give us the lowdown on some request, say a communications program for a sales contest, and the first thing we would do is hole up in the Spruce Room, your typical corporate conference room, not exactly an inspiring place. At first, the ideas came slowly, painfully. But once we got started, nothing was off limits. God, the crazy ideas we’d come up with, laughing indecorously until tears ran down our cheeks and dripped on the faux mahogany conference table.

Eventually we’d land on an idea so good, so potentially successful, we marveled at our own genius. Take that sales contest I mentioned: We didn’t have a lot to spend on prizes; it would be more of a pride thing, to get the regions to work as teams in a friendly rivalry. Mark Bertolini, Aetna’s CEO, is a bit of a celebrity in that company. Our idea was to award a team each month with funds for an outing and a life-size cutout of Mr. Bertolini. The team would then go out, bringing along “Mr. Bertolini,” and take a picture with him in some location that was iconic of their region: maybe Buckingham Fountain in Chicago or by the Arch in St. Louis, etc. It would be Aetna’s own version of Flat Stanley: “Flat Bertolini.” We would then publish that picture in a monthly newsletter designed and distributed specifically for the contest.

Typically, after landing on a good idea, one of us would volunteer to write up the proposal. And we’d wait until….it was rejected by management, who wanted something a bit more conservative (i.e., derivative of our competitors and respectably boring). Sadly, Flat Bertolini was also rejected. So, instead of visiting Times Square or the Grand Canyon, in my mind’s eye I saw him standing a little lopsided on the back of a barge, floating off into the sunset, a brave smile on his flat executive face.

Golden opportunity

One particularly beautiful September morning, I took Max for a walk at a large prairie and wetlands preserve near our house. The sky was that cobalt blue you see only in September, and Max’s blond fur rippled in the breeze making him look like a dog in a pet food commercial. I should have noticed Max eagerly snuffing the air every time the wind picked up, but I was too distracted by the early fall beauty surrounding me. Our pathway passed tall marsh grass and cattails, which eventually opened up to reveal a small pond. Max lifted his head high ,and he perked up his ears. We stopped to take in the marshland view, and Max stood very still, very quietly next to me. The only sounds were of the rustling grass and the soft honking of the geese floating en masse in the middle of the pond. I took a deep breath, filling my lungs with the fresh morning air. Peaceful.

Then Max bolted for the pond. He had been readying himself for it the entire time we stood there (I realize now), and when he sprung, the leash flew easily out of my hand. Down the incline Max flew and into the muddy waters of the marsh. My calls were in vain. He sloshed through the marsh and into the pond where he swam with expert ease into the gaggle’s midst. The uproar was tremendous: honking, flapping wings, what seemed like a hundred geese taking off at once. They literally blocked out the sun and their shadow passed over me as they flew away. I looked around guiltily, fearing some authority figure would admonish me for the disturbance. But no one was in sight. Meanwhile, Max paddled in circles around the now-empty pond. If dogs could smile, he had a big one plastered across that golden face of his. He eventually came out of his own accord, wet, muddy and dragging his soggy leash behind him. The fun continued when we got home and I hosed him down in the backyard — Max loved the hose. Even though he failed to catch a goose, it was probably one of the greatest days of his life.

Breaking away

I have to admit, I’m still waiting for the greatest day of my professional life. And I hope to God it hasn’t happened already; I hope bigger and better things are still ahead. I’ve had my moments — that I can say with pride and confidence. Despite disappointments like Flat Bertolini, every once in a great while (whether it’s due to a full moon, extra fat bonuses or temporary madness, we’ll never know), the execs are disposed to approve a great idea. Then the heavens open, and the angels sing Gloria Hallelujah.

Being humans still in possession of our creative instincts, we owe it to ourselves to exercise our imagination and skills and give the best we have to offer – even if our employers don’t recognize the gems they’re rejecting. We owe it to ourselves to trust our experience and skills, to not crawl inside some suit’s head to give them what they think they want. Being “creatives,” it’s our job to give them what they don’t know they want.

Besides, it’s about the journey after all, right? Brainstorming with a crack creative team and coming up with an idea that not only meets its business goal but is innovative, and dammit, beautiful or poignant or humorous or even just simply fun. An idea whose end product you proudly place in your portfolio. An idea the memory of which will warm your cockles during those long corporate winters of communications drudgery. We owe it to ourselves — and the world, in fact — to break from the leash every chance we get and plunge into those sunlit waters.

 

 

 

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Brag professionally with effective press releases

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Effective press releasesWhen an established publication chooses to print positive information about you or your organization, that’s not just free advertisement – that’s validation. You can grab that priceless space, whether in print or online, by learning how to write effective press releases.

So, if your organization has earned bragging rights for an event, accomplishment or significant development, grab your pencil and get ready to write: Below are some tips to help you write press releases that are professional and more likely to spark interest.

Create a newsworthy angle
To write effective press releases, first develop your story to make sure it’s newsworthy. That will help ensure it grabs the attention of editors and entices them to include it in their publications. For example, instead of using your press release to announce your new CFO, focus on the new direction the CFO will take, how this will positively impact the organization, what customers and investors can expect from this new hire, etc.  Angle the story of the press release to show how readers might benefit by your organization’s actions. Continue reading Brag professionally with effective press releases

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How to develop a simple writing style

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Ah, corporate speak. Easy fodder for jokes and complaints. An obvious mark of bloated posturing and a surefire remedy for insomnia. But this kind of bombast has an uncanny way of slithering into a message if even the most sincere writer isn’t vigilant. Copy that’s full of corporate jargon and tediously long blocks of text often gives the impression that the writer or organization is hiding something.

On the other hand, simple writing delivers a clear message to your audience. Simple writing also builds trust by communicating sincerity. So, try using straightforward, concise copy to reassure your audience and bring your message into the light.

Take a peek at the infographic below for tips on developing a simple writing style that resonates with your readers:Simple writing

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Mrs. Schlepke’s substitute: Helpful reference books

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writing reference booksYou have a writing assignment, and you’re typing away in a flurry of inspiration. (Or is it desperation because your deadline looms?) Suddenly, a question pops into your head that makes you come to a dead stop: Should you use “affect” or effect”? Or maybe this is the question: Does the period go inside the quotes or outside? How about: Do you put commas in a date, and if so, where? Actually, it could be any of a hundred nagging little questions whose answers lie buried in the high school English class detritus left in your unconsciousness.

Instead of relying on dusty memory or calling Mrs. Schlepke, your freshman English teacher, out of retirement, it’s much easier to make sure you have a few handy-dandy reference books within reach. When writing professionally, whether for your job or for your career, it’s imperative that you present as close to a perfect communication piece as possible. Grammar, punctuation and spelling mistakes look sloppy and unprofessional. And you can’t rely on spell checker alone. If you’ve used “effect” when the correct word is “affect,” your mistake will go unnoticed by spell checker. Continue reading Mrs. Schlepke’s substitute: Helpful reference books

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Digging for the scoop: Tips on interviewing people for articles

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You have to write a newsletter article or press release, and Google won’t provide you with the information or quotes you need. But there’s a person you know, it could be a co-worker, a customer, a vendor or an expert in your industry, that has the scoop. But, wait, you’re not a reporter! And you have a feeling conducting an interview takes more than wearing a fedora and owning a notebook.

Don’t fret…You don’t need press credentials or a journalism degree to interview someone. A successful interview simply takes a little forethought and planning. Below are a few interviewing tips to get you started: Continue reading Digging for the scoop: Tips on interviewing people for articles

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8 Corporate Phrases to Creatively Destroy

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hammer-35244_1280Ah, corporate speak. Easy fodder for jokes and complaints. An obvious mark of bloated posturing and a surefire remedy for insomnia. But corporate speak has an uncanny way of slithering into a message if even the most sincere writer isn’t vigilant. And, we have to admit that corporate speak is so common because it’s both convenient and habit forming.

Many words and phrases that could now be labeled as corporate speak began as clever ways to communicate complex ideas, but overuse has rendered them vague and pretentious, causing more distraction than clarification. Probably most of us have fallen into its gilded trap at some point, especially when we’re trying to sound professional or knowledgeable but secretly lack the confidence to do so in our own words. Continue reading 8 Corporate Phrases to Creatively Destroy

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News you can use: Learn how to write newsletter articles

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Meet the pressSo, you need to develop a newsletter. You have the design ready to go, but you need more than lorem ipsum for the content. Where do you start? Well, here are some basic steps to writing a newsletter article:

  1. Consider your audience
  2. Determine your message
  3. Gather info
  4. Write the copy
  5. Include photos and/or graphics

Who are your readers and what will you tell them?

As with any communication piece, when you start writing newsletter articles, your first step is to consider your audience and the overall message or purpose:

  • Will the newsletter go to prospects?
  • Or to your organization’s employees?
  • Is the purpose to establish your organization as a helpful expert?
  • Or are you trying to persuade to purchase?
  • If your newsletter is internal, are you simply informing your co-workers?
  • Or are you trying to motivate your sales team?

Continue reading News you can use: Learn how to write newsletter articles

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Writing direct mail copy that sells

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Mailbox 2

You’ve got some great ideas brewing for the design for your marketing communications piece. But the copy is another story – so much to say but such little space!

Don’t fret yet! This is the first in a three-part series of articles that will give you copywriting tips for various marketing communications pieces. We’ll start with writing tips for direct mail copy, and future topics will include:

  • Developing newsletter content and writing articles
  • Writing frequently asked questions (FAQs)

Continue reading Writing direct mail copy that sells

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Writing clearly, saying it simply

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Window cleaning 2I recently received an email that demonstrated to me why writing clearly is a neglected skill set. An executive at the corporation where I work sent it, and it opened with these two paragraphs:

Organizational Announcement

“As we set our sights on the future and begin to transform our industry, it is essential that we have the right talent in place to drive growth and business success.

“For the past several months, my team and I have focused on long-term success planning and talent development. As part of those discussions, Ebenezer Geezer, the West Region president, informed me of his intention to retire at the end of this year.”

Wow, that’s a lot of lead-in before we get to point: Ebenezer Geezer is retiring. I, along with thousands of others in offices and cubicles across the U.S., got this email in the middle of a busy workday. How many actually read to the last sentence of the second paragraph? Did you?

I think the email should have been written more like this:

Organizational Announcement

“West Region President Ebenezer Geezer is planning to retire at the end of this year. We will greatly miss Ebenezer and his talent for cost cutting. My team and I, however, have a plan to make the transition to a new West Region president as smooth as butter. So, no worries, folks! This change won’t affect our profits or, most importantly, your jobs. So, keep working!” Continue reading Writing clearly, saying it simply

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